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Why CYOD Is Picking Up Steam

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Many organizations first resisted the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) model in which employees use their personal laptops, smartphones, tablets and other devices in the workplace. IT managers were concerned about device and data security, supporting and managing a wide variety of devices and applications, and a general lack of IT control in a BYOD environment.

However, as employees have continued to push to use their own devices at work, many IT managers have relented and even embraced the BYOD model. Proponents say BYOD boosts productivity and employee satisfaction, enables greater flexibility, and reduces technology costs. In fact, Gartner predicts that nearly four in 10 organizations will stop issuing company devices and rely exclusively upon BYOD by 2016. By 2020, 85 percent of companies will have a BYOD policy of some kind.

While BYOD has garnered much of the attention, the choose-your-own-device (CYOD) model has experienced slow, stealth-like growth. Somewhat of a compromise between BYOD and the traditional model, CYOD requires employees to choose from a group of company-approved devices. The desire to corral BYOD, eliminate management and security complexity, and create a more standard corporate IT environment led IDC to predict in 2013 that CYOD would render BYOD obsolete.

That hasn’t happened. BYOD is doing just fine. Cloud services have become more widely used, and employees can access cloud resources from their own devices without going through the corporate network. Organizations are relying more upon temporary and contract workers, and it doesn’t make sense to supply each of these individuals with a company-owned device. In some cases, BYOD is used on a limited basis for certain departments. For example, a simple change in phone number could affect a salesperson’s relationships with industry contacts.

But CYOD is growing, too. As data breaches continue to occur at an alarming rate, organizations and employees are becoming more sensitive to the issue of cybersecurity. CYOD enables IT to simplify device management and control how devices are used. Devices are preconfigured and security software is preinstalled. Also, concerns about employee satisfaction are overblown at times, as employees will typically end up with a device that makes them happy when CYOD is properly implemented.

Many organizations turn to CYOD because of the legal complications of BYOD. How do you differentiate work time from personal time and compensate employees accordingly? Where do you draw the privacy line between personal data and company data? Does your BYOD policy hold water with various state, federal and industry regulations?

When deciding between BYOD, CYOD and a hybrid approach, start by analyzing how employees use their mobile devices. Find out what applications are most popular with your employees and how these tools help them perform their job functions. If you don’t have employee buy-in, your model won’t work.

Once you choose a model, make sure you develop a security strategy that will protect your data inside and outside of the workplace, and create an incident response plan to minimize the impact of a breach. All of these decisions involve more than IT, so include legal, human resources and finance from the planning phase through implementation.

ICG understands pros and cons of CYOD and BYOD as they relate to the unique needs of small businesses and their employees. Let us help you devise a plan that prioritizes security and strikes the right balance between productivity, cost efficiency and employee satisfaction.

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